Verification and accuracy

Factually: Teaching fact-checking in Bolivia

One of the greatest strengths of the fact-checking community is its commitment to collaboration and knowledge-sharing across borders. Such was the case last week when Miriam Valverde, a fact-checker covering immigration for (Poynter-owned) PolitiFact (and Daniel’s colleague), traveled to La Paz, Bolivia, to teach fact-checking skills to journalists. Organized by the nonprofit Fundación para el […]

Factually: Games to teach media literacy

In this newsletter, we spend a lot of time highlighting how misinformation is a global problem. To that end, fact-checkers and others are trying to promote more media literacy worldwide — and some of those efforts are quite fun. In the past few years, several games aimed at teaching people fact-checking skills and how to spot […]

Factually: Politicians co-opt fact-checking

Fact-checkers are used to spin from politicians. But now, some politicians around the world have started to mimic fact-checkers’ work to score points with voters. On Tuesday, the IFCN’s Cristina Tardáguila published a story about how the government of Mexico’s President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has created its own fact-checking operation. Launched by Notimex, a daily newswire service […]

Factually: Harris debate performance triggers birtherism smears

Happy Independence Day to our U.S. readers! And Happy Thursday to everyone else! This newsletter has a global scope and reach because, as the IFCN’s sixth annual Global Fact-Checking Summit in Cape Town last month proved, fact-checkers around the world can learn from one another and build on and celebrate each other’s successes. Here in America […]

Factually: How much is misinformation to blame for news avoidance?

The idea that the spread of misinformation makes some people want to tune out the news altogether has always lent a paradoxical quality to the work of fact-checkers and other truth-tellers. It’s hard to deliver the truth if people are avoiding the news because they think there are too many falsehoods out there. Now comes […]

Factually: A few takeaways from Global Fact 6

Howdy from Cape Town! This week, the IFCN traveled to South Africa for our sixth annual Global Fact-Checking Summit. During the three-day event — the largest yet — journalists, technology companies, nonprofits and startups from around the world are mingling to discuss the possibilities and obstacles facing the future of fact-checking. What are those obstacles? It depends on […]

Factually: The problem with deepfakes

(June 13, 2019 newsletter) Today, the U.S. House of Representatives Select Committee on Intelligence is holding a hearing on deepfake videos. Researchers will testify to Congress about the potential threat manipulated content poses to national security — particularly in the lead-up to the 2020 election. And based on the past few weeks, the committee will have plenty to […]

America’s future fact-checkers know a lot already

Hey y’all, it’s Daniel. In this newsletter, we spend a lot of time reporting on and analyzing some of the internet’s biggest problems — and how fact-checkers do (or don’t) help solve them. But this week, I have some good news for you: The kids are alright. On Monday, I traveled to Detroit to teach […]

Factually: Some basic facts on the Pelosi fake

Fact-checkers and other players in the truth-telling business have been preoccupied in the past week by an altered video of Nancy Pelosi. The story, originally covered in The Washington Post, involves a slowed-down video designed to make Pelosi, the speaker of the United States House of Representatives, appear to slur her words and struggle to speak.The […]

Factually: Russia’s video play

The New York Times last week published a striking piece about how the Russian news network RT has been airing story after story about the dangers of 5G cell phones as part of a disinformation effort to undermine the United States’ comfort with — and advances in — the technology (which scientists say isn’t actually harmful). We say […]