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Fact checking and accountability journalism (Page 2)

The Week in Fact-Checking: Facebook is shaking things up. Or maybe it’s just a jiggle.

Almost eight months into its partnership with third-party fact-checkers, Facebook is shaking things up. The social network says it will be using “updated machine learning” to detect more potential fakes to flag to fact-checkers. Fact checks will also be appearing more often in related articles. Fact-checkers are being paid, a spokeswoman confirmed to The Wall Street Journal. (Meanwhile […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: Snopes in a snaggle

Snopes is in a legal mess, so founder David Mikkelson turned to its community for help. The audience responded with a crowdfunding effort that raised more than $600,000 in 48 hours. The American Press Institute has some thoughts on why the appeal resonated. Poynter takes a look at what Snopes says the money will be spent on. The San Diego Union Tribune does a nice […]

Why Snopes matters

In talks and presentations to students, journalists and news consumers, my first question for the audience often is: “What do you know about fact-checkers?” Someone might mention PolitiFact or The Washington Post’s Pinocchios or FactCheck.org. Among those who study such things, these are “the big three” fact-checkers in the U.S., all created in the mid-2000s […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: Some research to make you think and rethink

Two new studies this week could encourage you to change the way you write and market your fact checks. A study co-authored by FactCheck.org’s Kathleen Hall Jamieson indicates that using videos and humor in fact-checking can be more effective than text-only fact-checking. And research from Columbia University says that people are more likely to believe fake […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: The EU sees you, fake news

“Denying that the Holocaust happened is the biggest, most extraordinary and unacceptable fake news,” said the President of the Italian Chamber of Deputies at a recent parliamentary committee hearing. While U.S. media were criticizing Facebook and Google for their role in the fake news problem last summer, the wheels turned slower in European institutions. Read more on Poynter. […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: What can we learn from Wikipedia?

As a crowdsourced information platform, Wikipedia has had to “work to earn the trust of the public every day,” says Wikimedia Foundation leader Katherine Maher. Sound familiar? Maher, who spoke at Global Fact 4 today in Madrid, has some advice for fact-checkers on creating a transparent, useful and sustainable process. Read the story on Poynter. Quote of […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: Research on writing a better fact check

The number of fact-checking stories produced by journalists has increased dramatically over the last decade, but only recently have we truly explored how those stories could be better at attacking misinformation. Leslie Caughell, a political science professor at Virginia Wesleyan University, discusses what reporters might do (or not do) to make their fact-checks more effective. Quote of […]

New research: The characteristics of news stories that help attack misinformation

The number of fact-checking stories produced by journalists has increased dramatically in recent years, but could those stories be better at countering misinformation? Scholars and journalists have begun to explore the characteristics that improve fact-checking’s success in helping readers understand and accept factual information. My recent study, supported by the American Press Institute, examines how […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: You won, now go fix this thing

We’re counting on these projects to fix a couple of journalism’s stickiest problems: A mobile game that tracks falsehoods, a tool that busts lie-spewing bots, and a quality scorecard for media. They’re among the winners of a $1 million challenge from The Knight Prototype Fund to tackle misinformation and build trust in media. Read this morning’s announcement […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: We’ve seen this scene before

Anyone who’s been surprised by the role of false news in elections probably wasn’t paying attention in history class. David Robert Grimes, an Oxford University researcher who’s studied misinformation and AIDS, writes in The Guardian that dezinformatsiya campaigns were created and directed by the Russians decades ago. Today, he says, nearly all of us are to blame for the spread of […]

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