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What it’s like to be a ‘fixer’ in China: Foreign journalists can leave, but fixers have fewer protections from the government

Roads and Kingdoms

Christine Wei, a news assistant for AFP based in Beijing, talks to Piper French about what it’s like to be a “fixer” in a country that’s particularly tough on journalists: “They always tell us: you are a Chinese national, this is your home. Foreign journalists, they can leave any time they want, but you cannot: you have family here, you have parents here, a husband, kids. If you are making something that’s really crossing a line, we can just put you in prison. … To be a fixer in China — a fixer has no protection. A permanent employee has the support of foreign media — they have the Assistant Card,” which are issued by the Chinese government and can be shown if a government official is harassing or attempting to stop a journalist.

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