Millie Tran

Editorial Coordinator

Millie Tran was the editorial coordinator of the American Press Institute from May 2013 to January 2015.

Previously, she was the multimedia coordinator at the Council on Foreign Relations, where she wrote, edited and produced a weekly podcast. Prior to that, she helped launched launched National Journal’s Membership program as a marketing and design associate. She is also a graduate of the Atlantic Media fellowship program.

Millie’s skills and backgrounds are diverse — with experience on both the editorial and business side of media, as well as the for-profit and non-profit world. She likes to run toward wicked problems, connect the dots, and find the story.

A graduate of UCLA, she served as a tech columnist, opinion editor, and multimedia producer of the Daily Bruin — culminating in a first place award from the Associated Collegiate Press for a multimedia news feature. While there, she also wrote her thesis on cyber warfare and taught a seminar on the same subject.

The definition of ‘sponsored content’

Sponsored content / native advertising appears in many ways. There is no single form, but rather a continuum from banner ads to social media content to large microsites with articles and videos. The fragmented, inconsistent approaches are actually a feature, not a bug — “native” advertising is native to the specific publication or platform it […]

The four business models of sponsored content

There are four distinct models that we’ve seen so far, each with varying levels of involvement from the publisher and brand: Underwriting model: The brand sponsors content attached to normal reporting, or something that the publisher was creating anyway. This model preserves the most editorial independence. The brand is simply paying to have its name […]

Managing risks, maintaining standards and ethics in sponsored content

The resounding consensus we heard from summit participants was that upholding the publisher’s own brand and integrity, and thereby its readers trust, is an important principle. These brands seeking sponsored content partners are coming to publishers not only for their audience size but for their trust and integrity, says Rebecca Davis of Ogilvy. The brands […]

How sponsored content is created

As we noted in our discussion of the four business models for sponsored content, there are varying levels of involvement from the brand and the publisher. In some cases the brand is on its own to produce what it wants to publish. But in many cases someone working for the publisher plays a role. Most […]

How to measure success of sponsored content

Most publishers at our summit said they track all the typical content metrics when measuring the reach of sponsored content — views, unique visitors, time spent, etc. Most also share these metrics with sponsors but guarantee little or no specific results. Publishers that maintain more control over the content seemed to feel more comfortable guaranteeing […]

Unsolved challenges of sponsored content

Even the best experts we gathered for our summit acknowledged some areas where knowledge is missing. Reader impact: For one, it’s difficult to know what readers’ tolerance for and reaction to sponsored content is. For all the talk on many sides about whether credibility is affected, no one knows for sure. More research is needed. […]

Appendix: What specific publishers, brands and analysts are doing with sponsored content

We asked participants in our Thought Leader Summit on sponsored content to give us some specific information via a survey. Here were their responses: Publishers using sponsored content Forbes Mark Howard, chief revenue officer: Q: What does your organization offer in terms of sponsored content / native advertising / content marketing? What is the content […]

Measuring the impact of journalism: 10 questions with Charles Lewis and Hilary Niles

What is the impact of journalism, and how can it be measured beyond audience reach and website traffic? Those questions are tackled by Charles Lewis, executive editor of the Investigative Reporting Workshop at the American University School of Communication, and Hilary Niles, a graduate assistant at Investigative Reporters & Editors, co-authors of a new report