Insights, tools and research to advance journalism

Jane Elizabeth (Page 6)

Director, Accountability Journalism Program

Jane leads the American Press Institute's project to improve and expand accountability journalism. She is the Washington Post's former deputy local editor; and has taught journalism at Old Dominion University, the University of Pittsburgh and Point Park University.

Jane's work at five metropolitan U.S. newspapers has focused largely on politics, regional news and education. She was a reporter and editor at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; launched and directed PostLocal.com at the Washington Post as deputy local editor; and, as senior editor, created and managed The Virginian-Pilot's first digital news team.

She holds a master's degree in mass communications from Virginia Commonwealth University, and is a 2017 Knight Visiting Nieman Fellow at Harvard.

Purple: The Political Messenger

Purple: The Political Messenger Creators: Rebecca Harris and David Heimann Summary: Uses Facebook Messenger and SMS to add context to complex political news. _____________________________________________ The concept behind Purple is simple: Get explanations about complicated political events or issues as if you were asking a smart friend. No jargon, just a bit of wonkiness, and more […]

A portfolio of examples

The final section of this report examines 11 works of journalism from news organizations around the country that have found effective ways to present facts on complicated issues. First, an introduction to our list. Any discussion of 21st-century “explainers” must begin with Vox. The online-only news organization is a pioneer in the use of cards or […]

Improving accountability reporting: How to make the best of journalism better for audiences

By many measures, never have there been more efforts in journalism to scrutinize and hold powerful people and institutions accountable. The number of news organizations doing fact-checking journalism has nearly tripled since 2014. Non-profit investigative news has expanded, along with a clearer effort in all kinds of reporting to call out deception and avoid false […]

Your turn

In this report we’ve endeavored to demonstrate alternative ways to write and present complex, fact-filled content in a way that can be more effective in reaching audiences — even those who are disinclined to believe the information. We’ve also offered some recommendations for software and tools, and taken you behind the scenes in the creation […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: Facebook is shaking things up. Or maybe it’s just a jiggle.

Almost eight months into its partnership with third-party fact-checkers, Facebook is shaking things up. The social network says it will be using “updated machine learning” to detect more potential fakes to flag to fact-checkers. Fact checks will also be appearing more often in related articles. Fact-checkers are being paid, a spokeswoman confirmed to The Wall Street Journal. (Meanwhile […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: Snopes in a snaggle

Snopes is in a legal mess, so founder David Mikkelson turned to its community for help. The audience responded with a crowdfunding effort that raised more than $600,000 in 48 hours. The American Press Institute has some thoughts on why the appeal resonated. Poynter takes a look at what Snopes says the money will be spent on. The San Diego Union Tribune does a nice […]

Why Snopes matters

In talks and presentations to students, journalists and news consumers, my first question for the audience often is: “What do you know about fact-checkers?” Someone might mention PolitiFact or The Washington Post’s Pinocchios or FactCheck.org. Among those who study such things, these are “the big three” fact-checkers in the U.S., all created in the mid-2000s […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: Some research to make you think and rethink

Two new studies this week could encourage you to change the way you write and market your fact checks. A study co-authored by FactCheck.org’s Kathleen Hall Jamieson indicates that using videos and humor in fact-checking can be more effective than text-only fact-checking. And research from Columbia University says that people are more likely to believe fake […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: The EU sees you, fake news

“Denying that the Holocaust happened is the biggest, most extraordinary and unacceptable fake news,” said the President of the Italian Chamber of Deputies at a recent parliamentary committee hearing. While U.S. media were criticizing Facebook and Google for their role in the fake news problem last summer, the wheels turned slower in European institutions. Read more on Poynter. […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: What can we learn from Wikipedia?

As a crowdsourced information platform, Wikipedia has had to “work to earn the trust of the public every day,” says Wikimedia Foundation leader Katherine Maher. Sound familiar? Maher, who spoke at Global Fact 4 today in Madrid, has some advice for fact-checkers on creating a transparent, useful and sustainable process. Read the story on Poynter. Quote of […]

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