Insights, tools and research to advance journalism

Jane Elizabeth (Page 2)

Director, Accountability Journalism Program

Jane leads the American Press Institute's project to improve and expand accountability journalism. She is the Washington Post's former deputy local editor; and has taught journalism at Old Dominion University, the University of Pittsburgh and Point Park University.

Jane's work at five metropolitan U.S. newspapers has focused largely on politics, regional news and education. She was a reporter and editor at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; launched and directed PostLocal.com at the Washington Post as deputy local editor; and, as senior editor, created and managed The Virginian-Pilot's first digital news team.

She holds a master's degree in mass communications from Virginia Commonwealth University, and is a 2017 Knight Visiting Nieman Fellow at Harvard.

In closing: Final thoughts, acknowledgements and a call for your ideas

What can you do now to create a social media team that’s ready for 2020? Here’s a quick list of ideas from experts in this report. To build community interest and engagement, try starting the conversation on social media and continuing it in your publication or broadcast, rather than the other way around. Resist the […]

Resources and more reading

Essays from the experts “Social Journalism: The Who, What, Where, When, Why and How.” Julia Haslanger/CUNY Graduate School of Journalism and the Tow Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism Social media facts and statistics you should know.  Social Report blog.  Data to help create strategies in your news organization. “Inside Forbes’ lean approach to creating stories for social […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: Does fake news ever die?

Since he died seven weeks ago, at least 20 of Paul Horner’s fake news websites have gone down, a Poynter analysis found. (The site information is available in this shared document). While the infamous misinformation creator’s death is no longer in question — despite initial media doubts and Twitter conspiracies — his legacy is. Quote of the week “Two things are clear. […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: “You failed.”

Google, Facebook and Twitter were questioned this week on Capitol Hill about their roles in the proliferation of fake news and disinformation during the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Slate asks if the entities “are too big” to fix their own problems; Recode had the rundown of what happened; and CNET has a collection of critical quotes from U.S. senators at Wednesday’s hearing. Quote of […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: New research on brains, fakery and truth

This week, researchers released significant studies that you really should read. Here are our short summaries; click on the names for more details:  People believe misinformation even when it comes from a source they don’t like (Brendan Nyhan and Yusaku Horiuchi) … The way people define and view fake news might not be what you think (Rasmus Kleis […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: The latest political faux-check

Imitation is the highest form of flattery, right? In a sign of the growing appeal of the term “fact-checking,” Czech prime ministerial candidate Andrej Babiš launched a website aping an existing fact-checking outfit’s name. Unsurprisingly, its “fact checks” cast Babiš in a positive light. But will it make a difference? Quote of the week “Historians and […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: How to beat bad Twitter

Think you know how to tell a real tweeter from a fake one? Test yourself with  10 tips compiled by digital sleuther Henk van Ess for Poynter. Quote of the week “Most people, most of the time, don’t use social media for politics. But in the days before a major election or referendum social media platforms provide […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: Who’s more worried about fake news, Facebook’s tough week, and dealing with ‘disinfobros’

Quote of the week “If you can generate attention you get paid. If you yell fire in a theater, you still get paid. Attention gets rewarded and not quality of information.”   —  Twitter founder Ev Williams on social media platform advertisers’ desire for attention. Treading on the partisan divide Eighty-eight percent of Donald Trump supporters told […]

The Week in Fact-Checking: German elections, fake news for Halloween, and everyone out of the Twitter pool

German voters go to the voting booth on Sunday and “fake news” has been less of a concern. A propaganda expert tells Correctiv that bots were dormant during the campaign. Still, Motherboard found plenty of misinformation spread from both Russian and American media outlets. The Alliance for Securing Democracy created a dashboard to track the Russian efforts. Either way, the regional […]

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